PBHL 521
Cancer Screening

Cancer screening aims to detect the disease at a stage when it is asymptomatic and curable. This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of cancer screening in the United States. Students will learn to draw conclusions about the benefits and harms of screening for cancer, given available evidence from epidemiologic studies and clinical trials. Issues surrounding screening for breast, colorectal, lung, cervical, and prostate cancer will be covered; other cancers will be covered if time permits. Class sessions will include lectures as well as student-led discussions.

Prerequisites

Previous undergraduate or graduate coursework in public health or permission of the instructor.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about the methodology used to assess cancer-screening tests and how to interpret cancer-screening data
  • Identify potential benefits and harms of cancer screening
  • Become familiar with the evidence in favor of and against population-based screening for breast, colorectal, lung, cervical, and prostate cancer as well as with the controversies that surround mass screening for these diseases

Overview

Program

Class Type

Graduate Course

Credits

1

Availability

Currently Not Available